Accelerometry for outdoor effort quantification

Assessing the lower limb properties in-situ is of a major interest for analyzing the athletic performance. From a physical point of view, the lower limb could be modeled as single linear spring which supports the whole body mass. The main mechanical parameter studied when using this spring-mass-model is the leg-spring stiffness (k). In laboratory conditions, the movements are assessed using a force plate (Meth1) which measures the ground reaction force (GRF), and a motion capture system which could estimate the displacement of the centre of mass (CoM). In this way, k is calculated as shown in equation (2).More recent methods allow to calculate k in field conditions by using either foot switches (Meth2) or accelerometry-based instruments (Meth3) which are both wireless devices. The associated calculated methods assume that force-time signal is a sine wave, described by the equation (3) with equation (4) (CT: contact time; FT: flight time). In these cases, the kinematic measurement (CoM) could be calculated either by a mathematical approach (Eq.(5)) (meth2), or by double integrating the acceleration (meth3) in order to calculate k.Thanks to their transportability, the methods 2 and 3 offer not only the possibility to assess the lower limb movements, but also, to objectively follow up the athletic abilities (performance, reactivity, force and power, stiffness) in-situ.


Listed In: Biomechanical Engineering, Biomechanics, Sports Science


A POLYMER-BASED MICROFLUIDIC RESISTIVE SENSOR FOR DETECTING DISTRIBUTED LOADS

This poster presents a polymer-based microfluidic resistive sensor for detecting distributed loads. The sensor is comprised of a polymer rectangular microstructure with an embedded electrolyte-filled microchannel and an array of electrodes aligned along the microchannel length. Electrolyte solution in the microchannel serves as impedance transduction. Distributed loads acting on the polymer microstructure give rise to different deflection along the microstructure length, which is recorded as the resistance change in electrolyte solution. This sensor can detect distributed loads by monitoring the resistance change at each pair of electrodes. Owing to great simplicity of the device configuration, a standard polymer-based fabrication process is employed to fabricate this device. With custom-built electronic circuits and custom LabVIEW programs, fabricated devices filled with two different electrolytes, 0.1M NaCl electrolyte and 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide electrolyte, are characterized, demonstrating the capability of detecting distributed static and dynamic loads with a single device.
Listed In: Biomechanical Engineering