ground reaction forces

More Push from your Push-Off: Joint-Level Modifications to Modulate Propulsive Forces in Old Age

Even prior to walking slower, older adults walk with a diminished push-off – decreased propulsive forces (FP) accompanied by reduced ankle moment and power generation. The purpose of this study was to identify age-related differences in the joint-level modifications used to modulate FP generation during walking. We posit that there are two possibilities for older adults to enhance FP generation. First, older adults may increase ankle power generation and thereby alleviate compensatory demands at the hip. Alternatively, older adults may opt to exacerbate their distal to proximal redistribution by relying even more on the hip musculature. 10 healthy young adults and 16 healthy older adults participated in this study. Subjects walked at their preferred speed while watching a video monitor displaying their instantaneous FP while instructed to modify their FP to match target values representing normal and ±10% and ±20% of normal. For all trials, we estimated lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics. During normal walking, older adults exerted smaller FP and ankle power than young adults. Enhancing FP via biofeedback alleviated mechanical power demands at the hip, without changes in ankle power. Further, older adults walked with increased FP without increasing their total positive joint work. Thus, given the same total requisite power generation, older adults got ‘more bang for their ankle power buck’ using biofeedback.
Listed In: Biomechanical Engineering, Biomechanics, Gait


VERTICAL GROUND REACTION FORCES DURING UNEXPECTED HUMAN SLIPS

Falls due to slippery conditions are among the primary causes of disabling workplace injuries. Despite the extensive amount of human slip studies in the literature, only a handful of studies have reported ground reaction forces at the instant of slip initiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify the vertical ground reaction forces (VGRF) at slip initiation during unexpected human slips across different footwear-contaminant conditions. Forty-seven healthy subjects were unexpectedly exposed to a liquid–contaminant, while the vertical force was measured at the moment that the foot began to start slipping. The average VGRF were between 100 and 300 N and varied significantly across the footwear. These forces were significantly less than the typical forces (400-700 N) applied during slip-resistance measurements. This finding may suggest that available coefficient of friction (ACOF) measurements should use lower force levels in order to achieve higher relevance to the onset of slipping.
Listed In: Biomechanics, Gait


Modeling 3D Ground Reaction Forces During Walking Using Nanocomposite Piezo-Responsive Foam Sensors

This study presents a new technique for acquiring ground reaction forces from novel, nanocomposite piezo-responsive foam (NCPF) sensors. A shoe was fitted with four NCPF sensors located at the heel, arch, ball, and toe positions. Running data was collected simultaneously from both the shoe sensors and from a force-sensing treadmill. A portion (30 randomly selected stance phases) of the treadmill data was used to develop a predictive stochastic model of GRF based on the sensor inputs. The stochastic model was then used to predict GRF for the remaining shoe sensor data, which was then benchmarked against the treadmill data. The results indicated that this model was able to predict forces in the x-axis (anterior-posterior) with 2.38% error, forces in the y-axis (medial-lateral) with 6.01% error, and forces in the z-axis (vertical) with 2.43% error. These novel sensors hold potential to dramatically improve both the ease and expense associated with GRF data, as well as allow unprecedented ability to measure GRF during real world applications outside of the laboratory.
Listed In: Biomechanical Engineering, Gait, Mechanical Engineering, Sports Science