Laxity Testing

Measuring Soft Tissue Contributions to Elbow Joint Motion and Virtual Ligament Modelling An In-Vitro Study

Knowledge of ligamentous contributions to joint stability is essential to restore normal joint range of motion and functionality through reconstruction procedures. Although, there has been numerous studies on the pathomechanics of the elbow joint, there have been very few rigorous and systematic attempts to characterize the roles of soft tissues during clinically relevant motions. Five fresh frozen cadaveric elbows from three male subjects were used for this study. In-vitro simulations were performed using a VIVO six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) joint motion simulator (AMTI, Watertown, MA) capable of virtually simulating the effects of soft tissue constraints (virtual ligaments). This study introduces a unique, hybrid experimental-computational technique for measuring and simulating the biomechanical contributions of ligaments to elbow joint kinematics and stability. In vitro testing of cadaveric joints is enhanced by the incorporation of fully parametric virtual ligaments, which are used in place of the native joint stabilizers to characterize the contribution of elbow ligaments during simple flexion-extension motions using the principle of superposition. our results demonstrate the importance of AMCL and RCL structures as primary stabilizers under valgus and varus loading respectively. Virtual ligaments demonstrate the ability to restore the VV stability of the joint in the absence of any soft tissues attached to the osseous structures. This demonstrates the effectiveness of “virtual” ligaments for in vitro testing of elbow joint biomechanics, with applications in pre-clinical assessment of elbow implants.
Listed In: Biomechanical Engineering, Biomechanics, Mechanical Engineering, Orthopedic Research