Examining Postural Control With and Without Visual Feedback in Individuals with history of Ankle Sprain | Force and Motion

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Examining Postural Control With and Without Visual Feedback in Individuals with history of Ankle Sprain

Conference: ACSM
Abstract: Lateral ankle sprains are common orthopedic injuries and often result in chronic ankle instability (CAI). Studies have shown that the CAI population typically has decreased ankle proprioception and possibly a greater reliance on visual feedback when compared to healthy controls. However, little is known about how the postural control characteristics change in those with and without CAI when external visual feedback is manipulated. Purpose: To compare postural control characteristics of persons with CAI, Copers and healthy adults when performing a single leg balance test with and without external feedback. Method: The definition for CAI used for this study includes persons who have experienced recurrent ankle sprains, in addition to self-reported “feelings of instability” and “giving way,” and a score on the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability (IdFAI) of 11 or greater. 18 participants with CAI, 15 Copers, and 18 healthy controls (mean age of all groups: 22 years) performed the Athlete Single Leg Test on the Biodex Balance System (BBS) at Level 4 which involved a high degree of platform instability. All participants completed 2 trials without and with feedback in that order. Center of pressure position was recorded and the two trial mean was used for further analysis. Overall stability index (OSI) defined as the mean distance of the center of pressure from the center of the platform was obtained from the system. Sway area was calculated using custom Matlab script. Separate 3 (Group) x 2 (Feedback) mixed ANOVAs were run using overall stability index (OSI), and sway area as dependent variables. Results: Significant feedback main effect showed participants had significantly lower (better) OSI value with feedback (1.4±0.1) compared to without feedback (2.6±0.2; P < 0.001) but sway area with feedback (8.61±2.33cm2) was similar to without feedback (10.94±2.43 cm2). There was no significant group main effect or interaction observed for either of the variables. Conclusion: Results suggest that external visual feedback may not play a significant role in helping persons with CAI improve their postural control.
Listed In: Orthopedic Research, Physical Therapy,
Tagged In: chronic ankle instability

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